UN Anthem for the Fight Against Poverty

Feb 22, 2007 | Post a Comment

Hindu.com reports on the new UN anthem for the fight against poverty:

Poverty has no caste or gender, but it now has a voice in the form of music virtuoso A R Rahman, whose English single “Pray For Me Brother” will be the UN’s anthem for its Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) campaign.

The MDGs comprise a set of eight promises by world governments to end poverty, hunger and disease by 2015.

After rocking India with his “Vande Mataram”, Rahman’s first English song, released by Universal Music, is his call to wipe poverty off the face of the earth.

Read entire Hindu.com article.

The power of music and art can help raise awareness and concern. The UN can’t end poverty and hunger on its own. Hopefully powerful songs such as Rahman’s will inspire more people to get involved.

What do you think?

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About Scott Hughes

I created this website to raise awareness and start discussion on important issues like world hunger and poverty. I also published the book Holding Fire: Short Stories of Self-Destruction. I have two of my own kids who I love so much. I just want to be a good role model for them. I hope what I do here makes them proud of me. Please let me know you think about the post by leaving a comment below!

One Response so far | Have Your Say!

  1. its my name
    February 22nd, 2007 at 7:26 pm #

    I think that the U.N. creates hunger and keeps third-world countries in poverty as means of controlling global money and food supplies; not to mention keeping themselves in power by making it seem as if they are fighting hunger. But how can you fight what you work daily to create? How dare someone so intimately informed, such as yourself, suggest that the U.N. can do anything at all to curb poverty and hunger. They have created poverty and hunger so that they can continue controlling those populations. Let us not be coy on this subject.

Children suffering from Poverty